faculty

Susan Parkhurst

susanp@fredhutch.org

Fred Hutch, 

Cancer Biology

Cell Signaling & Cell/Environment Interactions

Developmental Biology, Stem Cells & Aging

Mechanisms of wound repair, cytoskeletal dynamics, and nuclear architecture in Drosophila

Faculty Contact Information

Building: Weintraub Room: A1-187 Phone: 206-667-6466 Alt Phone: 206-667-6489 http://research.fhcrc.org/parkhurst/en.html

Lab Information

Location: Fred Hutch Building: Weintraub Room: A1-187 Phone: 206-667-6489 Alt Phone: 206-667-4511 http://research.fhcrc.org/parkhurst/en.html

Accepting Students For:

Rotation, Autumn
Rotation, Spring
Rotation, Summer
Rotation, Winter
Permanent

Publications

Prepatterning by RhoGEFs governs Rho GTPase spatiotemporal dynamics during wound repair.

Nakamura M, Verboon JM, Parkhurst SM.

The Journal of cell biology. 2017; 216(12):3959-3969.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
28923977
PMCID:
PMC5716286

Wash functions downstream of Rho1 GTPase in a subset of Drosophila immune cell developmental migrations.

Verboon JM, Rahe TK, Rodriguez-Mesa E, Parkhurst SM.

Molecular biology of the cell. 2015; 26(9):1665-74.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
25739458
PMCID:
PMC4436778

Wash interacts with lamin and affects global nuclear organization.

Verboon JM, Rincon-Arano H, Werwie TR, Delrow JJ, Scalzo D, Nandakumar V, Groudine M, Parkhurst SM.

Current biology : CB. 2015; 25(6):804-810. NIHMSID: NIHMS658832

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
25754639
PMCID:
PMC4366290

Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins in the nucleus: aWASH with possibilities.

Verboon JM, Sugumar B, Parkhurst SM.

Nucleus (Austin, Tex.). 2015; 6(5):349-59.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
26305109
PMCID:
PMC4915506

Rho family GTPase functions in Drosophila epithelial wound repair.

Verboon JM, Parkhurst SM.

Small GTPases. 2015; 6(1):28-35.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
25862164
PMCID:
PMC4601351

Research Summary

A hallmark of many diseases and cancers is a dysfunctional cytoskeleton. A properly functioning cytoskeleton is needed for a wide variety of cellular events ranging from cell shape to cell signaling and migration/metastasis. We use multidisciplinary approaches to study these dynamic structural elements in various processes including wound repair and nuclear architecture/organization. Our goal is to understand the role of these elements in regulating normal developmental events and how this regulation goes awry in diseases/cancers, thereby providing new avenues for possible therapeutic targets.