faculty

Daniel Stetson

stetson@uw.edu

University of Washington, 

Genetics, Genomics & Evolution

Microbiology, Infection & Immunity

Innate immune detection of nucleic acids

Faculty Contact Information

Building: 750 Republican St Room: E-453 Box: 358059 Phone: 206-543-6633 http://immunology.washington.edu/daniel-b-stetson-phd

Lab Information

Location: University of Washington Department of Immunology Building: 750 Republican St Room: E-440 Box: 358059 Phone: 206-221-5743

Accepting Students For:

Rotation, Autumn
Rotation, Spring
Rotation, Winter
Permanent

Publications

SUMO2 and SUMO3 redundantly prevent a noncanonical type I interferon response.

Crowl JT, Stetson DB.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2018; 115(26):6798-6803.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
29891701
PMCID:
PMC6042150

Intracellular Nucleic Acid Sensing Triggers Necroptosis through Synergistic Type I IFN and TNF Signaling.

Brault M, Olsen TM, Martinez J, Stetson DB, Oberst A.

Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 2018; 200(8):2748-2756. NIHMSID: NIHMS942451

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
29540580
PMCID:
PMC5893403

The A946T variant of the RNA sensor IFIH1 mediates an interferon program that limits viral infection but increases the risk for autoimmunity.

Gorman JA, Hundhausen C, Errett JS, Stone AE, Allenspach EJ, Ge Y, Arkatkar T, Clough C, Dai X, Khim S, Pestal K, Liggitt D, Cerosaletti K, Stetson DB, James RG, Oukka M, Concannon P, Gale M Jr, Buckner JH, Rawlings DJ.

Nature immunology. 2017; 18(7):744-752. NIHMSID: NIHMS874380

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
28553952
PMCID:
PMC5697900

Intracellular Nucleic Acid Detection in Autoimmunity.

Crowl JT, Gray EE, Pestal K, Volkman HE, Stetson DB.

Annual review of immunology. 2017; 35:313-336.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
28142323

The AIM2-like Receptors Are Dispensable for the Interferon Response to Intracellular DNA.

Gray EE, Winship D, Snyder JM, Child SJ, Geballe AP, Stetson DB.

Immunity. 2016; 45(2):255-66. NIHMSID: NIHMS808505

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
27496731
PMCID:
PMC4988931

Research Summary

Research in the Stetson lab focuses on mechanisms by which cells detect and respond to viral infection. All organisms have viral pathogens, and an ancient and fundamental mechanism for detecting viral infection makes use of sensors that recognize viral nucleic acids. We study these sensors, how they are activated, how they are regulated, how they organize protective immunity to virus infection, how we can trigger them with better vaccines, and how we can treat human autoimmune diseases caused by inappropriate activation of these same pathways.