faculty

Susan Parkhurst

susanp@fredhutch.org

Fred Hutch, 

Cancer Biology

Cell Signaling & Cell/Environment Interactions

Developmental Biology, Stem Cells & Aging

Mechanisms of wound repair, cytoskeletal dynamics, and nuclear architecture in Drosophila

Faculty Contact Information

Building: Weintraub Room: A1-187 Phone: 206-667-6466 Alt Phone: 206-667-6489 http://research.fhcrc.org/parkhurst/en.html

Lab Information

Location: Fred Hutch Building: Weintraub Room: A1-187 Phone: 206-667-6489 Alt Phone: 206-667-4511 http://research.fhcrc.org/parkhurst/en.html

Accepting Students For:

Rotation, Autumn
Rotation, Spring
Rotation, Summer
Rotation, Winter
Permanent

Publications

Into the breach: how cells cope with wounds.

Nakamura M, Dominguez ANM, Decker JR, Hull AJ, Verboon JM, Parkhurst SM.

Open biology. 2018; 8(10).

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
30282661
PMCID:
PMC6223217

Correction: Wash exhibits context-dependent phenotypes and, along with the WASH regulatory complex, regulates Drosophila oogenesis (doi:10.1242/211573).

Verboon JM, Decker JR, Nakamura M, Parkhurst SM.

Journal of cell science. 2018; 131(9).

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
29717005
PMCID:
PMC6295116

Wash exhibits context-dependent phenotypes and, along with the WASH regulatory complex, regulates Drosophila oogenesis.

Verboon JM, Decker JR, Nakamura M, Parkhurst SM.

Journal of cell science. 2018; 131(8).

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
29549166
PMCID:
PMC5963843

Prepatterning by RhoGEFs governs Rho GTPase spatiotemporal dynamics during wound repair.

Nakamura M, Verboon JM, Parkhurst SM.

The Journal of cell biology. 2017; 216(12):3959-3969.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
28923977
PMCID:
PMC5716286

Wash functions downstream of Rho1 GTPase in a subset of Drosophila immune cell developmental migrations.

Verboon JM, Rahe TK, Rodriguez-Mesa E, Parkhurst SM.

Molecular biology of the cell. 2015; 26(9):1665-74.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
25739458
PMCID:
PMC4436778

Research Summary

A hallmark of many diseases and cancers is a dysfunctional cytoskeleton. A properly functioning cytoskeleton is needed for a wide variety of cellular events ranging from cell shape to cell signaling and migration/metastasis. We use multidisciplinary approaches to study these dynamic structural elements in various processes including wound repair and nuclear architecture/organization. Our goal is to understand the role of these elements in regulating normal developmental events and how this regulation goes awry in diseases/cancers, thereby providing new avenues for possible therapeutic targets.