faculty

Nina Salama

nsalama@fredhutch.org

Fred Hutch, 

MCB Director

Cancer Biology

Genetics, Genomics & Evolution

Microbiology, Infection & Immunity

Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori stomach infection

Faculty Contact Information

Building: Hutchinson Room: C3-159 Box: 358080 Phone: 206-667-1540 Alt Phone: 206-667-1545 http://research.fhcrc.org/salama

Lab Information

Location: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Building: Hutchinson Room: C3-135 Box: C3-168 Phone: 206-667-1545 http://research.fhcrc.org/salama

Accepting Students For:

Rotation, Autumn
Rotation, Spring
Rotation, Summer
Rotation, Winter
Permanent

Publications

The Helicobacter pylori cell shape promoting protein Csd5 interacts with the cell wall, MurF, and the bacterial cytoskeleton.

Blair KM, Mears KS, Taylor JA, Fero J, Jones LA, Gafken PR, Whitney JC, Salama NR.

Molecular microbiology. 2018; 110(1):114-127. NIHMSID: NIHMS983028

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
30039535
PMCID:
PMC6195823

Increased H. pylori stool shedding and EPIYA-D cagA alleles are associated with gastric cancer in an East Asian hospital.

Talarico S, Leverich CK, Wei B, Ma J, Cao X, Guo Y, Han G, Yao L, Self S, Zhao Y, Salama NR.

PloS one. 2018; 13(9):e0202925.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
30208068
PMCID:
PMC6135355

Droplet Digital PCR-Based Detection of Clarithromycin Resistance in Helicobacter pylori Isolates Reveals Frequent Heteroresistance.

Sun L, Talarico S, Yao L, He L, Self S, You Y, Zhang H, Zhang Y, Guo Y, Liu G, Salama NR, Zhang J.

Journal of clinical microbiology. 2018; 56(9).

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
29925646
PMCID:
PMC6113488

Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

Waskito LA, Salama NR, Yamaoka Y.

Helicobacter. 2018; 23 Suppl 1:e12516.

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
30203582

High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori clarithromycin resistance mutations among Seattle patients measured by droplet digital PCR.

Talarico S, Korson AS, Leverich CK, Park S, Jalikis FG, Upton MP, Broussard E, Salama NR.

Helicobacter. 2018; 23(2):e12472. NIHMSID: NIHMS940073

PubMed [journal]
PMID:
29480566
PMCID:
PMC5867253

Research Summary

Helicobacter pylori infection is the major risk factor for stomach cancer, the third leading cancer killer worldwide. We study how this bacterium diversifies its genome and maintains helical cell shape, two adaptations that allow colonization in the unusual environment of the human stomach. We also explore the molecular cross talk between host and bacterium during chronic infection that drives disease. Our host interactions studies utilize immortalized cell lines, primary human gastric cells in 3D culture and mouse models to probe colonization and progression of preneoplastic lesions.